Writing

Check out up-to-date writing on my Medium account.

Academic Publications

The Global Warming Impact: How Forensics Pedagogy Can Reinforce ‘Just Sustainability’

Chapter in Competition, Community, and Educational Growth by Peter Lang Publishing, 2018.

Abstract: This entry distinguishes captive orcas from their wilder and freer kin. We speculate that captive orcas embody three principle metaphors: Prisoner; Activist; Martyr. These metaphors help us to imagine the kinds of rhetorical thinking necessary for a deeper understanding of the

“Killer” Metaphors and the Wisdom of Captive Orcas 

Rhetoric Society Quarterly, Issue 3, published by Taylor & Francis

Abstract: This entry distinguishes captive orcas from their wilder and freer kin. We speculate that captive orcas embody three principle metaphors: Prisoner; Activist; Martyr. These metaphors help us to imagine the kinds of rhetorical thinking necessary for a deeper understanding of the costs of human behavior as well as the potential for creating new visions and modes of witnessing. By witnessing orcas-as-prisoners, humans begin to see marine parks anew, as prisons, understanding their own complicity in the imprisonment of animal activists. Captive orca metaphors help to convey the actions of other-than-humans as rhetorically salient and politically motivated.

Internatural Activists and the “Blackfish Effect”: Contemplating Captive Orcas’ Protest Rhetoric through a Coherence Frame

Frontiers in Communication, January 2017

The documentary film Blackfish (2013; http://www.blackfishmovie.com) follows Tilikum, a captive SeaWorld prisoner-orca responsible for the death of trainer Dawn Brancheau and two others. The film has had a profound effect on public perceptions of orca captivity creating the “Blackfish Effect.” Our critical analysis of the film engages Plec’s (2013) internatural communication categories of complicity, implication, and coherence. We argue that the film illustrates the flawed hierarchy within the binary/dualistic system. In deconstructing a dualism, we must recognize the physical power and actions of captive orcas that could be seen as a form of protest rhetoric. The case example of orcas in captivity as a whole illustrates that regarding orcas as unique actors with intelligible behaviors offers a way of understanding how to listen to the more-than-human world. Our article has been one attempt to illustrate how captive orcas can be heard as extra-human citizens who participate, and even instigate, policy making.

Other Publications

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Voting For the Green Party doesn’t make me a Trump Supporter. Non-Ficion. Published October, 2016 at NonProphet News.

 

 

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I Missed My Best Friend’s Funeral and I’m Still Not Sure How to Deal with Death. Non-Fiction. Published May, 2016 at Hello Giggles.

 

 

 

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New Year’s Resolutions Inspired by Things I’ve Read. Non- Fiction. Published January, 2016 in Lumen Magazine

 

 

 

Lumen Pain

 

Hurt a Little Harder: On “Faking it” and the Gendered Experience of Pain. Non-Fiction. Published July, 2015 in Lumen Magazine

 

 

 

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The Empathetic Move: The Spirit of the Carnivalesque. Non-Fiction Art Criticism. Published July, 2013 in Manor House Quarterly 

 

 

 

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The Rhetoric of Securitization: How the US Declared War on the Environment. Non-Fiction Research. Presented 2013 in Western States Communication Association, Reno, Nevada

 

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Simulacra: The Mythical Made Real Personal Blog on Tumblr

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